Big Bank Take Lil’ Bank

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Ever heard the phrase if you want to hide something from a Negro, put it in a book? Stemmed from the writings of Carter G. Woodson in the Miseducation of the Negro, it is the tell-tale design of the method on limiting the insight and access to pertinent information that ultimately removes the advancement of an entire race of people.

Woodson asserts that the control of a man’s thoughts removes the need to control a man’s actions. Thus, paving the way for perpetual self-destruction. We see the remnants of this truth in many facets of modern society: our justice system, educational institutions, and financial institutions to name a few. While I am indeed interested in the dynamic nature of history and the intentional design of outcomes, Money Issues focuses on anything and everything that could potentially lead to an issue that our community will face within the context of finance.

The twenty-first century is riddled with massive technological advancements, and the theory of hiding knowledge in a book may seem antiquated, yet, the lack of knowledge still pervades within the vast majority of our community when it comes to financial literacy.

Ever heard the phrase if you want to hide something from a Negro, put it in a rap lyric? Stemmed from the writings of Drea (that’s me), and inspired by the lyrics of YG’s widely popular song, “Big Bank”, it is the tell-tale design of the method on limiting the insight and access to pertinent information that ultimately removes the advancement of an entire race of people.

In laymen’s terms, I am going to argue, that most of the people blasting this song as they cruise down the street with their windows down or popping bottles in the club do not realize that they are reciting a song that represents the antithesis of YG’s outwardly appearance and instead, lyrics that are forthcoming with the most genius collaboration of acquisition, entrepreneurship, investing, risk, reward and return.

Extract the profanity (or not – depending on the way you like to get your point across – #judgementfreezone) and you have the blueprint of what an amass of wealth resembles when everything you’ve worked for finally adds up and comes to fruition. Basically, big bank took lil’ bank.

Growing up I heard that phrase often exchanged between other young boys whether during a game of dice or walking around with a braggadocios attitude to tout a greater financial independence than the other (I grew up in South LA, and attended a predominantly black elementary and junior high school- just to confirm). A little less “hood” example might be a reference to the game of Monopoly and buying up properties on Pennsylvania Ave.

Nevertheless, the amount of pride that resides within the phrase “Big bank take lil bank” can only be understood by someone who has pulled themselves up by the bootstraps and as YG admits – “Got my foot in the door and we still here, I’m a first generation millionaire, I broke the curse in my family not having s%#$”.

He further goes on to explain how he did it: “I’m rare as affordable health care, Or going to wealth from welfare, I turn my W’s to M’s, yeah I flip those…”

The rarity that he is describing has to do with the level of difficulty many blacks face in moving beyond a reality of impoverishment. If you partake in sharing any financial responsibility of your medical care, you can identify with YG’s juxtaposition to how rare the affordability of it is or even the potential of what a life of wealth really looks like.

Flipping what you have into millions… buying anything with crypto (cryptocurrency that is), maintaining what you’ve built – he calls it “everything proper, no propaganda”… takes one thing and one thing only.

Mindfulness. YG gives us the secret in the very first verse:

While he may not actually use that term – I mean come on would it even sound the same? Absolutely not. But, there is something you can glean from “I got white folks money that I won’t blow, if you ask why ‘cause the white folks don’t.” I may not agree with the comparison of anything wealth worthy to the possessions of the white man – however, he makes a profound point. Whatever he’s got, he’s not going to blow it. That there my friends is mindfulness.

Keepers, I would like to suggest a few things to consider from this information that YG has gifted us:

(1) The knowledge that we need to come up is not always hidden literally – often times its right there in plain sight – or in this case on the tip of our tongues. But, as Carter G. Woodson laid out for us, once our thoughts are controlled our actions are inevitably dictated.

(2) When you get your foot in the door – do you have a plan for staying there? What is your strategy?

Let’s continue to push the envelope of introspection.

After all, isn’t our goal is to get to the bankroll on what it do, boo? status.

Drea

Photo Source: YouTube Screenshot

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